Domain Play: Events and Ministers

So as discussed in the cheatsheet, we’ve got a little economy simulator.

To keep it interesting, though, things need to happen:

Each year, determine the “year theme”. This can be:

  • (01-70%) Political
  • (71-00%) Natural
  • (doubles on the dice:) Supernatural, in addition to the rolled theme. Pick a supernatural monster type:
    • 01-10% Aberration
    • 11-15% Celestial
    • 16-30% Dragon
    • 31-40% Elemental
    • 41-55% Fey
    • 55-70% Fiend
    • 70-00% Undead

Once you’ve got the year themes, each turn, you’ll roll the month’s event on the proper table. On doubles on an event roll, consult the supernatural table.

Political Events

  • 01-30% War event. See Political(War) Events, below. Note that each turn, any active war events continue.
  • 31-60% Domestic event
    • 31-40% Farms
      • 31-33% Banditry: -1sp per farmer >1 day from settlements
      • 34-35% Drought: -1sp per farmer >1 hex of body of water
      • 36-37% Flooding: -1sp per farmer <1 hex of body of water
      • 38-40% Booster crop: +1sp per farmer <1 day from settlements
    • 41-50% Settlements: Select a random settlement (even chance of each);
      • 41-44% Corruption & Criminality: Lower industry of settlement by 1/2 until dealt with.
      • 45-46% Fires: 1d20% of the settlement dies
      • 47-48% Disease: 1d20% of the settlement dies
      • 49-50% New discovery: Raise industry of entire domain 1d6 percentage points
    • 51-60% Factions
      • 51-53% Death of leading member of most powerful faction; new leader has opposite opinion
      • 54-56% Political upset; most powerful faction yields 10% of its power to least powerful faction.
      • 57-60% Appointment of friendly member within most powerful faction
  • 61-70% New neutral faction forms from 10% of most powerful faction:
    • 61-66% New guild, company, or other asset- or skill-based group
    • 67-69% New clan, noble house, or other bloodline-based group
    • 70% New religion
  • 71-90% No event! Births, weddings, capture of criminals.
  • 91-00% New Resource; placement:
    • 91-93% Wilderness
    • 94-97% Near a village
    • 98-99% Near a town
    • 00% Near a city

 

Natural Events

  • 01-45% Disaster event
    • 01% Tornado: 1d6 hexes 50% destroyed.
    • 02-05% Bad Weather: 1% of farms destroyed.
    • 06-10% Drought: -1sp per farmer >1 hex of body of water
    • 11-14% Flooding: -1sp per famer <1 hex of body of water
    • 15% Major Flooding: Body of water switches course, 1d% destroying all in its path.
    • 16-20% Fires: 1d20% of one settlement dies.
    • 21-25% Landslide: 1 hex 10% destroyed
    • 26-28% Tremor: 1 hex 50% destroyed
    • 29-30% Earthquake: 1d6 hexes 1d% destroyed.
    • 31% Volcano: One mountain erupts, 100% destroying its hex
    • 32-35% Collapse: One resource collapses on its workers, destroying 50% of population.
    • 36-45% Tapped: One resource will be exhausted in 1d12 months at current rate.
  • 46-70% Domestic Event
    • 46-50% Settlement Corruption & Criminality: Lower industry of one settlement by 1/2 until dealt with
    • 51-53% Death of leading member of most powerful faction; new leader has opposite opinion
    • 54-56% Political upset; most powerful faction yields 10% of its power to least powerful faction.
    • 57-60% Appointment of friendly member within most powerful faction
    • 61-65% Banditry: -1sp per farmer >1 day from settlements
    • 66-70% Booster crop: +1sp per farmer <1 day from settlements
  • 70-90% No Event!
  • 91-00% New Resource; placement:
    • 91-93% Wilderness
    • 94-97% Near a village
    • 98-99% Near a town
    • 00% Near a city

Supernatural Events: Roll a d6:

  1. Outbreak: One settlement has 1d6 * 10% its total experience point value in supernatural creatures of the given type openly become active in it.
  2. Infiltration: One settlement has 1d10% of its total experience point value in supernatural creatures of the given type become active in it.
  3. Influence: One faction become influenced by the given type.
  4. Influence: One settlement becomes influenced by the given type.
  5. Conjunction: Gateways are active between worlds, and a single envoy from one arrives.
  6. Signs and Portents: A comet is seen, a two-headed birth produced, etc.

 

Political(War) Events: You start out at peace with each of your neighbors, and they have 0% of their military along their borders. Each time a war result is indicated, they will commit some percentage of their standing military, plus some percentage of conscript/newly minted military, to their borders. As war events are continually indicated, this will eventually result in skirmishes along the border and even open warfare.

Plot events can easily accelerate this timeline: for instance, if you muster troops along your own (peaceful) borders, assume that each neighbor musters an equal number.

Each time a war event is indicated, check for new belligerents.

  • All non-belligerent neighbors with >25% of your troops along their borders are automatically belligerents.
  • Otherwise, the single non-belligerent neighbor with the most troops along a shared border becomes belligerent (even with a ridiculous number of troops, like 0% 🙂 ).
  • Once a neighbor is a belligerent, they remain so until you pacify them diplomatically or their armies break morale (as a result of losses).

Each turn, each belligerent will:

  • Check morale
    • If fewer than half the dedicated troops remain, they’ll sue for peace. Other events can also drive surrender: for instance, the coming of winter will cause a conquest war to end, as both sides find its execution too difficult.
  • Increase belligerence by the lower of 1d10 * 5 percentage points (when this goes over 100%, it means they’ve levied additional troops)
  • Make a maneuver
    • The war can be in one of several stages. Begin at peace; each turn the enemy mirrors your actions and increases the level only on a 1-in-10.
      • Peace: While the belligerents may build up forces along a shared border, they will not take direct hostile actions.
      • Raiding: Forces will hit-and-run targets within striking distance of the border, but will not attempt to move the border itself.
      • Conquest: Forces will be placed in targets in an attempt to shift the border, but their goal is specific to the region; once they hold some set of geography and resources, peace may be attainable.
      • Total War: The belligerents are marching on their enemies in an attempt to seize their assets and to remove them from the map.
    • Once a stage advances, the tactics of the enemy will continue along that vein (as appropriate).

Resolving Battles:
The smaller side loses (40 + 1d20)% of its forces and slays that same number of the larger side (not necessarily to death: injury, broken morale, underequipped, or just generally made unfit for continued service). The side with more units remaining at the end is the winner of the field: if they were raiding, they extract wealth, if they were conquesting or making total war, they hold the target and your forces must either retreat or be occupied.

After a rout, you are able to retreat the better of 2d10 * 10% of your surviving population, and 1d% of the defeated population can be brought back into service in the next turn.

When raiding, the enemy can carry away up to 50 gp per surviving soldier from the settlement. If this is less than or equal to the output of the settlement (so 10x tax value), there are no side effects. If it is less than 10 times the output, the settlement is damaged, and must be repaired by investing twice that quantity into it before it will produce again. If it is greater than that value, the settlement is effectively destroyed. An enemy may choose to loot less than they could to avoid triggering these stages.

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About lackhand

I was born in 1984 and am still playing games, programming computers, and living in New York City. View all posts by lackhand

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